Dance Tips – Video : Bachata & Merengue Fusion Dance (LFX Dancers)

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Bachata & Merengue Fusion Dance (LFX Dancers)


Video

Description

Bachata and Merengue Fusion Choreography. This piece was choreographed by Edwin M. Ferreras, International Ambassador of Dominican Arts. This choreography is a modern interpretation of Dominican music and dance, « Bachatarengue » Choreographed by Edwin Ferreras.

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Music Artist: Elvis Martinez « Maestra », Los Hermanos Rosario « La Dueña Del Swing »

Dance Artist: Sianna Santana, April Amparo, Sergio Sanchez and Edwin Ferreras

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What is Bachata and How to dance Bachata.

Bachata is a style of dance that originated in the Dominican Republic in the mid 1900s but gained popularity only after 1960s. Bachata’s roots are found within Bolero and Son, two Cuban based music and dance. When Dominican artists in the Island began to innovate with new sounds, instruments and rhythms and with the influence of Merengue which is one of the oldest Afro-Caribbean music and dance forms, we saw the chronicles of what would later be known as Bachata.

Today bachata is danced widely all over the world and is one of the leading music industries first made popular by the likes Jose Manuel Calderon, Rafael Encarnacion, Blas Duran, Luis Segura, Marino Perez, Ramon Cordero and Edilio Paredes amongst others. They were considered the first generation Bachataeros when the music was known as Musica de Amargue. When the name Bachata, which meant informal party or gathering in a patio, was attributed to the music, we got the second generation and wave of Bachata Artists Luis Vargas, Antony Santos, Raulin Rodriguez, Teodoro Reyes, Kiko Rodriguez, Tony Santos, Joe Veras, Frank Reyes and many others who dominated during the 90s. Todays newer generation of Bachata artists include Andy Andy, Domenic Marte, Luis Miguel Del Amargue, Joan Soriano, Aventura, Romeo Santos, Prince Royce, Toby Love and many other prominent artist. With new innovations in the music more and more ways of dancing Bachata have emerged around the world.

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Merengue began making its appearance in the mid-1800s in a northern region of the Dominican Republic, which today is known as El Cibao. Following its prominence it subsequently spread throughout the entire motherland.During Rafael Trujillo’s reign (1930-1938), merengue was officially recognized, and still celebrated today, as the national music of the Dominican Republic.

After Trujillo’s demise, Dominican music industry changed tremendously as the process of migration and urbanization accelerated through the land.

Although merengue music draws many instrumentation similarities to its counterpart/rival Bachata, it is very distinct in feeling and energy. Merengue also shares many similarities to its neighboring genres: Palo, Mangulina, Salve, Gaga, Bachata, and its distant relatives Salsa and Son. Typically characterized as simple, festive, joyful, free-spirited and very interactive, Merengue has several distinct sub-genres including Tipico (perico ripiao), Mambo (urban merengue), Merengue Alibaba (carnival music), Orchestral Merengue, Merengue De Guitarra (bachatarengue), Pambiche (Palm Beach) and more. Each style is played at varying speeds and may be targeted to a certain social economic class, generation, or even gender. Most people in and out of the island simplyen joy all kinds of merengue with little regards to the type, this is in part due to the simplicity and welcoming and almost inviting feeling of its rhythms.

Yo soy el merengue, inspiración de los Dominicanos. El sentir del quisqueyano y la razón de su existir, soy la inspiración de mi país” –Johnny Ventura